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The deciduous broad-leaved forests that now cover 11 percent of North America north of Mexico were in their infancy.

Also, white oak acorns almost all ripen the same year they are pollinated, sometimes germinating before they even fall.

Only a lone white oak species, the Gambel oak (Quercus gambelii), even comes close, and that species is limited to the southern Rockies.

In the mountains of southern Arizona, the iconic white oak Quercus arizonica often grows beside the red oak Quercus emoryi.

In the lowlands of Florida, white oak species separate across the sandhill, scrub and ravine habitats shaped by karst topography and fire.

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